Workshops

Workshop presented at 2008 ICT Summit – First Nation Technology Council Conference, February 21 - 23rd, 2008 Vancouver Coast Plaza, 1763 Comox St, Vancouver. Presented on February 22nd.


Workshop presented at Seeing Ourselves in the Mirror: Giving Life to Learning, Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre, February 28, 29, March 1, 2008, Westin Bayshore, Vancouver. Presented on March 1st.


Research Powerpoint
View PPT - 32 slides, 617 KB

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Introduction

This workshop presented our 3-phase BC Campus-funded project lead by Nicola Valley Institute of Technology in partnership with Kwantlen University College.

Overview

Providing appropriate online content and learning strategies for First Nations students is challenging. We want to provide an accessible, comprehensive resource that provides direction and technique to all teachers across the province and beyond. There is a need to explore and incorporate Pre-Colonial and First Nations situated Pedagogy into online course design and delivery. We also need to propose teaching and learning strategies that meet First Nation student needs and that fit the online environment.


Purpose

This workshop addressed the first phase of the project: best practices. Working with workshop participants we explored effective instructional strategies and essential elements of an online course that ensure success for Aboriginal learners


What do we mean when we say First Nations Pedagogy? Although the notion of Pedagogy is essentially Colonial or Eurocentric in origin, it can be used to draw well-deserved attention to the distinct and noteworthy ways that Pre-Colonial education was offered and engaged in. Distinct practices used for millennia to teach both “theory” and hands-on practical knowledge were repressed and banned during Colonization, yet the methods have endured and are both unique and extremely valuable in the 21st century


Value

Online content that is designed using First Nations Pedagogy methods is not only valuable for aboriginal students – it would be very powerful to teach ALL students in this way BUT all aboriginal students have the legal right to be taught using these methods, no matter what educational context they are studying in. In fact, the efforts to afford a liberal education for all university students is a mere whisper of the potential that First Nations pedagogy promises: a well rounded, holistic, intelligent professional.


Pre-Colonial educational approaches are profoundly different from those of the current mainstream educational system . Holistic (physical, mental, spiritual, emotional) growth and development of the person, Experiential learning, Oral tradition, and Student-centeredness are key elements of the First Nations pedagogical approach Further, and of vital importance, is the fact that it is grounded in Spirituality.


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